It is best to plant your roses as soon as possible after receiving them, remember they are living plants. If planting is delayed it is best to leave the package un-opened until you are ready to plant. If you would like to see the plants carefully reseal any packaging after inspection, this is to prevent the roses drying out. Never let the roots dry out, this will result in plant losses, if they do dry immerse in water for about an hour before planting or if soil conditions will not allow replace in the packaging until planting.
Store the roses in a cool but frost free building, e.g. a garage; they will keep in good condition for up to ten days.



Good soil preparation is essential to get the best results.
Wait until the soil is in a workable condition, dig a hole large enough to accommodate the roots when fully spread, break the bottom to encourage drainage. At this stage incorporate some organic matter, this provides a source of nutrients and also helps retain moisture, e.g. well rotted manure or garden compost.
Planting depth is important, when finished the point at which the stems leave the main root should be slightly below ground level. Backfill the hole with fine soil spreading the roots as you go ensuring good soil contact, gently firming at the same time.
Finish off by carefully firming around the base of the plant with your foot, apply some rose fertilizer around the plant, to manufacturer's recommended rates and lightly rake the soil to get a level finish.
Roses handled carefully and properly planted transplant very well. They are suited to a range of soil types and situations however they do not succeed in wet boggy areas.
Extra care must be taken if replanting an area which has had roses previously growing on it; this is because the soil can get a problem and become ''rose - sick''.
The best remedy is to dig a hole about half as big again as a normal planting hole, remove the soil and replace it e.g. with soil from another part of the garden or bought top soil, then plant as normal.